Nina Murden - The Lewes Seamstress

linen

Roman Blinds for Bay Window

sarah-caron-blinds-2

 

Roman blinds in an light aqua/duck egg coloured Italian linen fabric for this light and airy bedroom. These replaced some others that came with the house buy, but they were stained, the cords were broken and the cleats were incorrectly placed and interfered with the blinds pulling up.  My replacement blinds, were lined, but not blackout lined, so the natural daylight looked lovely coming through  into the room in the mornings.  This fabric is  a very reasonable buy  @ £18 per metre and comes in 36 shades.

 

 

 

sarah-caron-blinds3

 

Working with some lovely fabric at the moment, which is being used for some floor length hand made curtains for a returning client,  Dawn Stacey. Being an artist herself, Dawn  has I think, wonderful taste and has chosen ‘Foxglove’ by the talented English designer Louise Body who works out of St Leonards in our very own sunny Sussex. It’s a 55% linen, 45% cotton mix fabric with a really good handle to it. See Louise ‘s other fabrics here:

http://www.louisebody.com/shop/Fabrics

Foxglove 2

Ian Mankin fabrics

Lovely choice of fabric from the Ian Mankin range for this Roman Blind.  A beautiful Linen and Cotton fabric, handled well, made up beautifully. Currently £34.50 per metre, but because it’s a Roman blind we only needed 1.5  metres.

http://www.ianmankin.co.uk/hopsack-stripe-sage-761-p.asp

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Working with Vintage Linens

Working with vintage fabrics

I have a lovely job to start this New Year working week  – a Roman blind being made with gorgeous vintage French linen – original a bed sheet, and bought on ebay, by a discerning and resourceful client.  This sort of material requires careful handling , has to be pressed before cutting, and needs very careful measuring and cutting as unlike new material off a roll, straight from a factory, this sheet has obviously been laundered a good deal over the years and the weave is now not as uniform as it was when new.  Basically it has no stiffening left in it apart from the inherent properties of the fabric – in this case linen which is pretty robust, or that imparted by normal washing powders and starches. It’s ‘wobbly’ and stretchy in parts and has to be laid out gently and particular attention has to be given to the grain and how it’s lays on the table.

My marvellous metal set square bought from Fifty Sheep , is invaluable.

This fabric has some lovely embroidery on it which we’re incorporating into the design of the blind.

side view of bottom of blind

side view of bottom of blind